Frequently Asked Questions


General Questions

  1. What is Harben California’s relationship with Harben, Inc?

  2. Does Harben California represent other manufacturers in addition to Harben, Inc?

  3. Does Harben California accept credit cards?

Purchase and Financing Assistance

  1. What’s an IRS Section 179 tax deduction?

  2. How have Section 179 provisions changed for 2015 and subsequent years?

  3. Is leased equipment eligible for Section 179 deduction?

  4. Where can I learn more about the eligibility of property for a Section 179 deduction?

  5. How can Harben California help private businesses acquire Harben jetters?

  6. How can municipalities and state agencies expedite purchases through cooperative purchases?

Jetting Equipment

  1. How do I sort through available jetting equipment to best fit my requirements?

Hydro Jetting Practices

  1. What’s the advantage of high pressure, low flow jetting?

  2. How can operators change pump pressure and flow rates to match job requirements?

  3. How do I find useful information about hydro jetting practices?

Pump Operation and Service

  1. Can I pump salt water and solvents, including diesel fuel and chemical additives, with Harben pumps?

  2. What does the term “run dry pump” mean? What is the significance of a run dry feature?

  3. What warranty terms apply to Harben pumps?

  4. How does the Harben pump work? What makes it unique among pumps used for jetting?

  5. Are special tools required to replace high pressure water hoses, diaphragms and check valves?

Parts Requirements

  1. If I have parts requirements for Harben pumps or Harben installed components, how do I get them?

  2. How late can you ship parts for urgent overnight deliveries?

Engines

  1. Do diesel engines supplied with Harben jetters conform to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board clean air regulations?

  2. What diesel engine choices do I have for Harben E-series, DT110 trailer jetters and truck skids equipped with Harben “P” pumps?

Trade Associations

  1. What is the CWEA?

  2. Who are CWEA members?

  3. What is the PHCC?

  4. Who are PHCC members?

  5. What is the CRWA?

  6. Who are CRWA members?

Answers to Questions


General Questions

  1. What is Harben California’s relationship with Harben, Inc?

    We're an independent, authorized service center and dealer for Harben jetting equipment, accessories and repair parts. Harben California is independently owned and managed by American Hydro-Vac Equipment Co., Inc. We have no ownership affiliation with Harben, Inc. or Flowplant Group, Ltd., the parent company of Harben, Inc. For more information about Harben, Inc., please visit www.harben.com. For the location of a dealer or service center near you, contact Harben, Inc. at 800-327-5387.

  2. Does Harben California represent other manufacturers in addition to Harben, Inc?

    Yes. Harben California is a dealer for nozzles, cutting tools, hose, video inspection equipment and accessories that add value to the operation of Harben jetters and pumps. Please see our About page for more information.

  3. Does Harben California accept credit cards?

    American Express, Visa and MasterCard credit cards are always welcome.

Purchase and Financing Assistance

  1. What’s an IRS Section 179 tax deduction?

    Section 179 of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code (26 U.S.C. § 179) allows a business to deduct the cost of equipment (and certain other property) on its income tax return as an expense, rather than requiring the equipment cost to be capitalized and deferred over a period of years as a depreciation expense. Click on the attached IRS link: Electing the Section 179 Deduction.

  2. How have Section 179 provisions changed for 2015 and subsequent years?

    The recently enacted Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act of 2015 ("PATH" Act) relaxed several restrictive qualifying provisions defining the eligibility of Section 179 purchases. For 2015 and subsequent years, businesses may expense the cost of qualifyingnew or used property up to $500,000.

    In addition, a “bonus depreciation” provision is available for businesses that acquire new equipment in excess of the $500,000 Section 179 maximum. A one-time depreciation allowance equal to 50% of the purchase price of new equipment acquired may be taken in the year of acquisition up to a maximum property value of $2,000,000.

    Section 179 depreciation allowance is truly a small business incentive. If the total value of new or used equipment acquired exceeds $2,000,000, the $500,000 Section 179 deduction is reduced dollar-for-dollar. This means that new or used equipment acquisitions above $2,500,000 won’t qualify for a Section 179 deduction.

    There are restrictions, however. The equipment must be “newly acquired” by the taxpayer. In other words, a separate small business venture cannot be created for the purpose of taking ownership of equipment previously owned or leased by an affiliated company having common ownership. Also, to take the deduction for tax year 2017, the equipment must be purchased outright or financed and put into service between January 1, 2017 and the end of the day on December 31, 2017.

    Here’s one more incentive. If a business with a qualified Section 179 deduction fails to earn enough income in 2015 to use the deduction, the credit can be carried forward to future years.

  3. Is leased equipment eligible for Section 179 deduction?

    The short answer is “yes”. However, only certain types of “capital” leases are eligible. These leases commonly are known as the “$1.00 Buyout Lease” and “10% Purchase upon Termination (‘PUT’) Lease”.

  4. Where can I learn more about the eligibility of property for a Section 179 deduction?

    Contact us for a referral to a qualified Section 179 lender or leasing company. Or, visit Section179.org, a website designed to explain IRS Section 179 in uncomplicated language, provide downloadable IRS forms and provide a Section 179 deduction calculator.

  5. How can Harben California help private businesses acquire Harben jetters?

    We'll introduce you to an account executive representing one of several well-established, knowledgeable finance companies that offer both installment and lease purchase financing plans to customers interested in acquiring jetting and video inspection equipment. Whether your business is newly established or decades old, there is a financing program that will help your company acquire the equipment needed to grow profitably.

  6. How can municipalities and state agencies expedite purchases through cooperative purchases?

    Municipalities and certain non-profit organizations can avoid administrative costs and delays associated with competitive bids by purchasing Harben jetters through a cooperative purchase program known as HGACBuy administered by the Houston-Galveston Area Council.

    This is a self-funded enterprise fund organized 30-years ago that allows local governments and state agencies to purchase a wide variety of equipment and services through contracts with suppliers, including Harben, Inc., that are authorized following a formal competitive bid process. The process gives participating governments the opportunity to specify the equipment, options and accessories they want and take advantage of volume purchasing and discounts.

    Membership in the H-GAC now includes more than 1,800 participants located throughout the United States. To learn more, visit www.hgacbuy.org. Once at the HGACBuy web site, obtain a temporary password that will provide access to all products and services offered through HGACBuy. With this password, select “Public Works Equipment”, then, “Sewer and Hydro-Excavation Equipment.” Scroll to Harben, Inc. for a list of equipment models and prices.

    Contact us at 949-515-3481 or email us at hydro-vac@pacbell.net to obtain information regarding the State of California authorizing statute.

Jetting Equipment

  1. How do I sort through available jetting equipment to best fit my requirements?

    Assuming you are a contractor and intend to use your jetter to clean surfaces and/or pipe, first organize existing job opportunities by the type of material, diameter of pipe or size of surface area, and the condition and type of pipe or surface to be cleaned.

    Second, consider how you want to transport your jetter including space restrictions, towing capacity and access into confined spaces. For example, large capacity jetters can be towed, transported by enclosed cargo vans and cube trucks or mounted on flat bed truck bodies and pick-up trucks. Small capacity jetters can be cart mounted and transported without water tanks. Although the size may be small, these jetters can be fitted with electric powered pumps that develop high pressure coupled with low water flow rates of 4 gpm or less. This may be all you need to clean surfaces and small diameter pipes blocked with grease.

    Third, consider the availability of water needed to sustain expected jetting operations. There’s no need to carry more water than necessary to the job site.

    Finally, put together a three to five year budget based on the revenue you believe your business will develop less operating expenses. Consider equipment financing costs, employee expenses, jetter repair and maintenance expense and insurance.

    Once you have mapped out your requirements for equipment, survey the range of available equipment. Then, call a Harben representative to for help in identifying equipment that will satisfy your requirements and fit your budget. There will be a machine just right for you.

Hydro Jetting Practices

  1. What’s the advantage of high pressure, low flow jetting?

    As a general rule, there is no need to flood a pipe with water in order to flush out sludge, mixed debris and grease. Small quantities of water delivered by pumps with peak pressure rates of 4,000 psi will develop enough hydraulic force to purge small and medium diameter pipes of grease, roots and mixed debris and scourer surfaces soiled with grease, paint, rust and chemical scale. Advances in nozzle technology and hydraulic cutting tools have made obsolete older jetting methods that relied on lower pressures and higher water flows.

    How can operators change pump pressure and flow rates to match job requirements?

    Flow rates are adjusted up the maximum rated capacity of the pump simply by changing the nozzle. This is achieved by selecting nozzles with restricted or enlarged numbers and/or diameters of jet orifices. Pressure is adjusted by increasing or decreasing engine speed.

    A unique feature of Harben pumps, regardless of flow capacity, is the operator’s ability to achieve the pump’s maximum rated flow rate at an engine speed less than required to maximize pressure. This means that operators are able to maximize pump pressure to scour pipes of grease or shred roots without flooding pipes with water. In the same fashion, operators can increase the pump’s flow rate in order to flush pipe of sludge or miscellaneous debris by backing off the engine throttle.

  2. How do I find useful information about hydro jetting practices?

    There are several good publications, web sites and blogs as well as a handy printed pamphlet produced by Harben, Inc. that is delivered with each new Harben jetter. For an informative new blog titled “Sewer and Drain Cleaning FAQs About Hydro Jetting”, visit superjetdrains.blogspot.com.

Pump Operation and Service

  1. Can I pump salt water and solvents, including diesel fuel and chemical additives, with Harben pumps?

    The short answer is yes. Most chemical solvents, corrosive liquids such as salt water and reclaimed water are safe to use with Harben pumps. This is an inherent advantage of Harben radial piston diaphragm pumps not matched by jetting equipment that use triplex and multiplex piston and plunger pumps.

  2. What does the term “run dry pump” mean? What is the significance of a run dry feature?

    Usually measured in terms of minutes, composite packing, valves, seals, “O”-rings, pistons and plungers in conventional triplex and multiplex pumps will quickly overheat if not continually lubricated with cool water. Harben pumps do not expose machined parts to high pressure water and can be operated indefinitely—hours, days or longer—without damage if the supply of water to the pump is interrupted. What does this mean to the jetter owner? Costly repairs and service interruptions are avoided if operators inadvertently shut off water to the pump of fail to keep water tanks supplied with water.

  3. What warranty terms apply to Harben pumps?

    Harben pumps are warranted for 5-years. Pumps sold by Harben California are protected unconditionally except as the result of damage caused by events unrelated to pump operation and the failure of operators to follow recommended pump maintenance practices. These include, but are not limited to, maintaining adequate oil levels, using recommended grades of oil and adhering to scheduled oil changes based on pump usage.

  4. How does the Harben pump work? What makes it unique among pumps used for jetting?

    Take a look at the video and read the accompanying explanation by clicking on the “Water Pumps” tab at the top of this screen. You’ll find the pump’s operation to be simple and straight forward. The pump’s exterior looks imposing. Looks are deceiving. It’s tough to damage, dependable to operate and easy to repair. We’re available to give you a hand if you need help.

  5. Are special tools required to replace high pressure water hoses, diaphragms and check valves?

    Just a few common hand tools and a little leverage. That’s it! With each pump, there’s a DVD and an illustrated service manual with large fold out explosion view diagrams, parts listing and maintenance recommendations. Harben service centers are established throughout the U.S. to give you a hand, wherever your hydro-jetting work takes you.

Parts Requirements

  1. If I have parts requirements for Harben pumps or Harben installed components, how do I get them?

    Call us at 800-587-4998 or 949-515-3481 from 7:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Pacific. E-mail your parts inquiry to hydro-vac@pacbell.net or fax it to 949-642-7745. If you’re located outside our normal Harben service territory of southern California and Baja Norte, we’ll help you identify a service center near you. Or, call Harben, Inc. at 800-327-5387 from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Eastern. E-mail your requirements or inquiries to ted.engle@harben.com . Visit www.harben.com and select “Contacts” to locate a Region Manager.

  2. How late can you ship parts for urgent overnight deliveries?

    We’ll ship UPS or FedEx to any CONUS destination for next day and next day, early A.M. delivery of parts if we receive your order by 5:00 p.m. Pacific. Please be aware that shipments to destinations outside southern California require the prior authorization of a dealer or Harben, Inc. Region Manager. Please contact us if you need assistance.

Engines

  1. Do diesel engines supplied with Harben jetters conform to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board clean air regulations?

    Yes. All engines meet U.S. EPA Interim Tier 4 standards (for more information, see Title 40, “Exhaust Emissions Standards”, U.S. EPA Clean Air Act). In California locations, jetters except those equipped with HiQ and Century pumps, are equipped with diesel engines that have brake horsepower ratings under 50 bhp. These jetters are exempt from registration under CARB PERP regulations. Learn more about the Portable Equipment Registration Program by visiting www.arb.ca.gov/portable/portable.htm. An exception applies to jetters operating at elevations above 6,000 ft. At higher elevations, larger cid diesel engines with brake horsepower ratings of 50 bhp or more may be required to enable Harben “P” pumps to achieve maximum rated performance levels.

  2. What diesel engine choices do I have for Harben E-series, DT110 trailer jetters and truck skids equipped with Harben “P” pumps?

    Choose from the following:

    • Deutz 3-cylinder air cooled industrial diesel engine, model D2011-L03i. This is the standard engine used to power Harben “P” pumps. To learn more, visit www.deutzusa.com. While specific information for this engine is not yet available on the Deutz USA website, general information may be found for the 2011 engine family. Select “engine families” from the index at the left of the Home page. Then, under “product search”, check the following: mobile machinery; 0-50; oil cooling. Scroll to the top of the page, mouse over and click on the highlighted engine identified as an L2011. Then, select “data sheet in pdf-format” near the bottom of the page describing L2011 engines. The BF3L2011 provides approximate information for the new D2011-L03i engine.
    • Kubota 4-cylinder water cooled industrial diesel engine, model V2203-M-E3B (03-M series). To learn more, visit, www.engine.kubota.ne.jp. Under the “Product” tab, select “engine catalogue”, then Kubota 03-M series. Scroll to V2203-M-E3B. You’ll be able to download a pdf file for product specifications.
    • Hatz 3-cylinder air cooled industrial diesel engine with Silent Pack shrouding, model 3L41C. To learn more, visit www.hatzusa.com. Select “Product Information” from the blue index listing, then “2-4L41C” under the heading “multi-cylinder engines”. You’ll be able to download dimensional drawings and specifications for the 3L41C engine.

Trade Associations

  1. What is the CWEA?

    California Water Environment Association (CWEA) is a California nonprofit public benefit corporation and state affiliate of the national Water Environmental Association. The CWEA conducts training workshops through local sections and designated training organizations and certifies wastewater professionals in six specialties, including Collection System Maintenance. Many wastewater agencies use the certificate program, with up to four grade levels, as a basis for hiring and promotion decisions. As such, the CWEA is a vehicle for professional growth and recognition in the wastewater industry. Learn more by visiting the CWEA website, at www.cwea.org.

  2. Who are CWEA members?

    Most of CWEA's members (about 80 percent) work for wastewater agencies, both large and small, with the balance consisting of engineering firms, manufacturers and equipment dealers representing products and services used by the wastewater industry.

  3. What is the PHCC?

    The Plumbing-Heating-Cooling Contractors Association (PHCC) is an association comprised of professional plumbing-heating-cooling (PHC) contracting businesses engaged in trades including plumbing, process piping, heating, refrigeration, ventilation and fire sprinklers. The Association sponsors training programs administered through local PHCC chapters as well as a statewide federally registered Apprenticeship Program with schools in Sacramento, Alameda and San Diego counties.

    PHCC offices also provide regulatory compliance assistance to member businesses and lobby State and local governments to publicize member interests and inform regulators and legislators about regulations and pending legislation pertinent to member businesses. Several local chapters sponsor trade shows and host educational workshops.

  4. Who are PHCC members?

    Members operate primarily small and medium sized, privately held business that undertake residential, commercial, industrial and institutional projects requiring a diverse set of trade skills applied to new construction, remodeling, maintenance service and repair.  Members also include manufacturers, engineering companies, dealers and service businesses offering products and services supporting other PHCC members.

    To learn more, visit the PHCC California website at www.caphcc.org/welcome-phcc or, find a local chapter at www.caphcc.org/phcc-california-local-associations.

  5. What is the CRWA?

    Incorporated in 1990, California Rural Water Association (CRWA) has emerged as the State’s leading association dedicated to providing on-site technical assistance and specialized training for rural water and wastewater systems.

  6. Who are CRWA members?

    For member and associate membership information, call or email the CRWA: 916.553.4900 or 800.833.0322. Email: info@calruralwater.org.